World Is Not Static; It Is Dynamic

Educators understand that the world is not static; it is dynamic, so we keep up the rest of the developments around a circle of novelty. The move from knowledge and routine learning into more skills-based education and making sure that students have the skills that they need for what is, increasingly, not just working within a small group, but working on student groups across the countries. The students collectively decide what they want to discover about a particular topic. They also interact more with their classmates than just a teacher-student interaction.

Students' inquiry is a great way to engage students and bring their voices into the classroom, so finding out what they're interested in first, let's find out together and guide them through the research process because that's a considerable curriculum component.

The skill and student-centric learning concept have students identify questions they want to learn. That will help educators connect what they are teaching from the curriculum document and their student's interests—providing them with an opportunity to do a peer assessment and even self-assessment. So, looking at the assessment as learning and for learning, they become more attuned to the next steps and can be independent learners. 

Students' readiness to learn depends on their physical and emotional development, interests, and experiences. Therefore, multiple entry points for any given activity allow all students to demonstrate their learning and reach their expectations.

Educators and teachers must provide opportunities for students to demonstrate what they are learning and connect to their family, their culture, and how they develop self-learning. Creating a learning environment that is student-centered and skill-based reflects students' individual needs and helps them develop skills and habits that sustain them for a lifetime.

It also allows them to practice, reflect and learn while receiving personalized instruction and constructive feedback.